News

19
May
2017

Two groups of Computation Institute researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory earned special awards from the office of the U.S. Secretary of Energy for addressing the global health challenges of Ebola and cancer.

04
May
2017

An international team of scientists including the Computation Institute has determined the 3-D atomic structures of more than 1,000 proteins that are potential targets for drugs and vaccines to combat some of the world’s most dangerous emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

01
May
2017

People have touted the potential of big data and computation in medicine for what feels like decades, promising more effective and personalized treatments, new research discoveries, and smarter clinical predictions. But only recently have these technologies made it to the clinic where they can actually improve patient care. At University of Chicago Medicine, several collaborations between physicians, researchers, and computational experts have produced such pioneering applications, from the pathology lab to the critical care wards.

Research

Bloodflow Model

Future petaflop simulations of realistic biological and physical systems will necessarily involve concurrent multiscale modeling. This project addresses the fundamental mathematical, algorithmic and software issues for simulating a human brain vascular model, the first of its kind, consisting of 100 large 3D arteries (Macrovascular Network, MaN), 10 million arterioles (Mesovascular Network,MeN) and one billion capillaries (Microvascular Network, MiN).

Beagle is a Cray XE6 supercomputer dedicated to biomedical research, funded by the NIH, owned by the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division, and operated by the Computation Institute. With 24,000 compute cores, 2 petabytes of storage, and a peak speed of 212 teraflops (212 trillion calculations per second), Beagle allows researchers in biology and medicine to dramatically scale up data analysis, modeling, and simulation tasks.

Conte Center logo

The overarching goal of our Center is to identify the genetic and environmental factors that underlie psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, and child & adolescent psychopathology. Our team develops and applies drastically new mathematical and computational strategies to infer causal relationships among genetic variation, environmental variables and psychiatric phenotypes.

Researcher Spotlight