30
Jun
2015

Since the first personal computer was developed 40 years ago, computational technology has dramatically changed human society. Unsurprisingly, this massive impact is also reflected in laws around the world, which struggle to keep pace with the mercurial advances of computers, smartphones, the internet, ebooks, and more. Starting on Monday, July 13, Randy Picker, professor at the University of Chicago Law School and Computation Institute Senior Fellow, will address these issues via his new Coursera course, “Internet Giants: The Law and Economics of Media Platforms.”

24
Jun
2015

The CI’s 2014-15 Inside the Discovery Cloud speaker series focused on collaboration, presenting pairs of speakers who are working together to unlock new knowledge through computation. Attendees heard about how new computational approaches are changing medicine, biology, social science, public policy, and more, and discover opportunities for new collaborations and student research projects. View the videos of these stimulating talks.

19
Jun
2015

More and more scientists are focusing their attention on how climate change will affect crop yield, farming practices, and food security for the world, and the massive implications for economics and health. Research on these important topics by Joshua Elliott of RDCEP is heavily featured in “Climate Change and Food Systems,” a new, free-to-download book published by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations.

18
Jun
2015

Reducing infant mortality, improving graduation rates for high school and first-generation college students, preventing home abandonment, and identifying legislative plagiarism are just some of the project goals for the 2015 Eric & Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good Summer Fellowship. For fourteen weeks, 42 fellows in Chicago will work with nonprofit and government partners on these and other important problems, applying data mining, machine learning, statistical, and social science techniques to craft novel and useful solutions.
 

12
Jun
2015

The web of science seems to be immeasurably large, with researchers around the world churning out papers in hundreds of different fields. So when scholars try to describe and explain how scientists weave new threads into the fabric of knowledge, they typically stick to very small patches . But in a massive new analysis of nearly 20 million biomedical journal articles, Knowledge Lab researchers constructed the most complete picture yet of the network of biomedical science -- and in doing so, found that it was surprisingly compact.

04
Jun
2015

Andrey Rzhetsky, professor of medicine and human genetics, isn’t a computer scientist by trade. But the messy complexity of biomedicine is a problem that fairly cries out for analysis by computation. It was also the perfect springboard for him to discuss the overarching theme in his work in his talk for the Visualization Speaker Series, “Adventures in Analysis of Large Biomedical Datasets”: getting data for complex networks, combining data sets, and drawing from them some “non-obvious conclusions.”