28
Jul
2015

The full potential of cloud computing to directly impact science, medicine, transportation, and other industries has yet to be realized. To help investigate and develop this promising cloud computing future, the Computation Institute (CI) at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory and the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin today announced that the new experimental testbed, called Chameleon, is in full production for researchers across the country.

27
Jul
2015

Scientific American looked at the Data Science for Social Good fellowship project that seeks to evaluate and improve police department early warning systems for predicting officer behavior and adverse incidents. Another DSSG project, using predictive analytics to fight lead poisoning, was also recently featured in the Chicago Tribune.

15
Jul
2015

The world’s food supply sits at a precarious balance. Swings in agricultural production due to drought or extreme heat can lead to spiking food prices, ecological damage, civil unrest, and other severe consequences. In a recent talk, the CI's Joshua Elliott estimated that these “once-in-a-century” threats may be far more frequent in the future, necessitating global protective measures.

13
Jul
2015

The Array of Things, an urban sensing "fitness tracker for the city," hit two important milestones this summer as a pilot project launched on the University of Chicago campus and the effort received funding from the UChicago Innovation Fund and Argonne.

10
Jul
2015

Distinguished Fellow is the highest rank achievable by an Argonne researcher, a rare honor that acknowledges influential discoveries and technical leadership. Once a year, the national laboratory names a maximum of four staff members to this highly select company, placing them among Nobelists, R&D 100 winners, and holders of more than 800 patents.

07
Jul
2015

For better or worse, Wikipedia is now one of the world's foremost resources for information on everything from string theory to obscure Star Wars characters. The general public and -- even if they won't admit it -- many scholars use Wikipedia as a first-order reference on unfamiliar scientific subjects, before diving more deeply into the primary sources. But doing so places faith in the hands of the Wikipedia community, trusting that a page's editors have drawn upon the best scientific evidence in summarizing the topic for a more general audience.