14
Sep
2015

The University of Chicago announced today that the National Science Foundation has awarded a $3.1 million grant to support the development of Array of Things, an urban sensing instrument that will serve as a fitness tracker for the city. Starting next year, 500 Array of Things (AoT) nodes will measure data on Chicago’s environment, infrastructure and activity to scientifically investigate solutions to urban challenges ranging from air quality to urban flooding.

28
Jul
2015

The full potential of cloud computing to directly impact science, medicine, transportation, and other industries has yet to be realized. To help investigate and develop this promising cloud computing future, the Computation Institute (CI) at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory and the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin today announced that the new experimental testbed, called Chameleon, is in full production for researchers across the country.

18
Jun
2015

Reducing infant mortality, improving graduation rates for high school and first-generation college students, preventing home abandonment, and identifying legislative plagiarism are just some of the project goals for the 2015 Eric & Wendy Schmidt Data Science for Social Good Summer Fellowship. For fourteen weeks, 42 fellows in Chicago will work with nonprofit and government partners on these and other important problems, applying data mining, machine learning, statistical, and social science techniques to craft novel and useful solutions.
 

01
May
2015

When writing the abstracts for journal articles, most scientists receive similar advice: keep it short, dry, and simple. But a new analysis by University of Chicago researchers of over one million abstracts finds that many of these tips backfire, producing abstracts cited less than their long, flowery, and jargon-filled peers.
 

23
Apr
2015

The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin, Indiana University, and the Computation Institute today announced that Wrangler, a groundbreaking data analysis and management system, is now in early operations for the open science community. The design and implementation of Wrangler responds to developments in technology and research practice that are collectively referred to as Big Data or the Data Deluge, encompassing a variety of needs related to research data storage, analysis, and access in the sciences and engineering.

24
Nov
2014

For three years, the Beagle supercomputer has driven University of Chicago biology and medical research into new computational territories, fueling groundbreaking research in genomics, drug design, and personalized medicine. Now, with a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, UChicago’s high-performance computing resource for biomedical research is ready for an upgrade that will enable the next wave of pioneering discoveries.
 

08
Oct
2014

Science is increasingly a global pursuit, with more and more collaborations spanning national and continental boundaries. A new analysis calculating the scientific impact of 1.25 million journal articles finds that papers with authors from multiple countries are cited more often and more likely to both appear in prestigious journals.
 

22
Sep
2014

The rapidly growing torrent of data openly released by governments offers incredible new potential for policy, research, and public engagement with cities. But as governments increasingly turn to advanced analytics to guide operations, officials and researchers need more powerful tools to find data-driven solutions to the complex problems that face urban areas.
 

19
Jun
2014

On the third anniversary of President Barack Obama establishing the Material Genome Initiative (MGI)—a multi-agency effort to transform materials science research in the United States through a national infrastructure—a consortium of research universities, national laboratories, and academic publishers announced the Materials Data Facility today.

02
Jun
2014

Under the specter of a warmer future, scientists must study the downstream effects of climate change on humans, including the impact on agriculture, the economy, and society. But the scale of global climate models and regional models of agriculture, hydrology, and other sectors may be orders of magnitude apart, forcing researchers to find novel methods of closing that gap.