Imagine you were able to solve a problem 50 times faster than you can now. With this ability, you have the potential to come up with answers to even the most complex problems faster than ever before. Researchers behind the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Exascale Computing Project want to make this capability a reality, and are doing so by creating tools and technologies for exascale supercomputers – computing systems at least 50 times faster than those used today. These tools will advance researchers’ ability to analyze and visualize complex phenomena such as cancer and nuclear reactors, which will accelerate scientific discovery and innovation.

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As the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE's) Exascale Computing Project (ECP) works towards its goal of creating computing systems at least 50 times faster than the nation’s most powerful supercomputers in use today, it needs research on how hardware and software will work together at these unprecedented speeds. As part of a 4-year $48 million funding award to tackle this challenge, the ECP recently selected four "co-design" centers, including one led at Argonne National Laboratory by CI Director Ian Foster.

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The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Exascale Computing Project (ECP) announced its first round of funding, including projects from CI Senior Fellows on astronomy, cancer, and urban science.

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For decades, computer scientists have coasted on the momentum of Moore's law, confident that the steadily increasing number of transistors on a microchip would eventually solve all challenges.

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When something goes wrong while you're running a program on your personal computer, the worst outcome is typically a reboot and the loss of any unsaved work. But when an application crashes on a supercomputer, the consequences can be much more dramatic. In his talk at the Computation Institute, Argonne's Franck Cappello discussed new resilience strategies for the next era of supercomputing.

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Next week, the world's experts on high-performance computing, networking, storage and analysis will gather in New Orleans for the 2014 edition of the international