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The University of Chicago has been associated with dozens of Nobel Prizes. But when CI Senior Fellow Lars Peter Hansen and Eugene Fama were awarded the 2013 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel last month, it was the first time since 1939 that two UChicago faculty have won the award simultaneously. To commemorate this historic honor, "The Work Behind the Prize" panel was held on November 4th at the Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts. The event was an opportunity for Hansen and Fama's peers in the Department of Economics and the Booth School of Business to pay tribute to the work that earned them the prestigious honor.

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Lars Peter Hansen -- Computation Institute Senior Fellow, Research Director at the Becker Friedman Institute and the David Rockefeller Distinguished

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A day after the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences celebrated a computation-enabled discovery 50 years in the making for the Nobel Prize in Physics, the prize committee chose to honor pioneers in another vibrant computational field with the Prize in Chemistry. On Wednesday, Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel received the chemistry prize for their contributions to the field of computational chemistry, developing software that allowed researchers to run simulations that incorporated both classical and quantum physics. The work created a modern environment where "​chemists now spend as much time in front of their computers as they do among test tubes" according to the Nobel Committee's materials. ​The CI's Center for Multiscale Theory and Simulation is one such place where the work of Karplus, Levitt and Warshel has been expanded to offer new insights in chemistry and biology. 

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In one of the more easily-called Nobel Prize announcements ever, the prize in physics was awarded this morning to Peter Higgs and François Englert for their theoretical work predicting the particle now known as the Higgs boson. Though their theory of the particle's existence was published in 1964, it took thousands of physicists and the $4.75 billion Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland to finally confirm its existence last year. So while Higgs and Englert will get the medal and the free trip to Sweden, today's award can be celebrated by scientists and institutions around the world, including our own. An article at the University of Chicago News site details the role played by UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the Computation Institute in the landmark discovery of the Higgs boson.