Research Center

The Urban Center for Computation and Data unites scientists from the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory with educators, architects and government officials to capitalize upon the

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The traditional scientific journal format has reached new limitations as science grows more data-intensive,and open data and global collaboration become more common drivers of research. Last week, CI research center Globus announced the trial launch of Globus data publication, a new service that makes it easier for researchers to describe, curate, preserve and discover data.

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As President Barack Obama addressed police chiefs in Chicago this week, a Data Science for Social Good project that uses data to prevent adverse police incidents received praise from the White House.

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Last week, the Urban Center for Computation and Data unveiled the alpha version of Plenario, a new online portal for accessing, comb

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UPDATE: Array of Things has been nominated for the Cooper Hewitt People's Design Award! Vote here until October 6th.



Many people now wear wristbands or other devices to track their activity, giving them access to rich data about their daily routine that can help guide them towards healthier decisions and behaviors. The ambitious Array of Things project, led by the Urban Center for Computation and Data, seeks to create a similar bounty of data to better understand the environment, infrastructure, and activity of cities, creating a new public instrument for research, education, and applications that improve the lives of city residents.

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A large chunk of a government's budget can be traced back to a small number of frequently used, expensive programs. These can include the costs of adult and juvenile incarceration, foster care for endangered children, or safety net services such as treatment for mental health or substance abuse for poor individuals. These programs don't operate in isolation; many individuals or families in one of the above programs will also be in at least one more at some point in their lives. Finding these social service "hotspots" could allow governments to more effectively distribute resources, reducing costs without sacrificing services at a time when budgets are especially tight.

But the data from each of these programs are walled off in different departments, such as the Departments of Corrections or Children and Family Services, with limited to no sharing across bureaucratic lines. In his Sept. 27 talk at the Computation Institute, Robert Goerge, a CI senior fellow and senior research fellow at the University of Chicago's Chapin Hall, described how integrating these silos of public sector data can inform more efficient government spending, and how computation can help.