Press Release

With a $4.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, the University of Chicago’s Globus and leading cancer researchers at University of Chicago Medicine will build new protected cancer research networks that enable collaborations while keeping sensitive health data secure and private.

Event
Joshua Elliott, RDCEP & Funmi Olopade, UChicago Medicine
January 21, 2015
Searle 240 and Webcast

Funmi Olopade - Using Whole Genome Sequencing and Parallel Computing to Understand the Genetic Archit

Press Release

For three years, the Beagle supercomputer has driven University of Chicago biology and medical research into new computational territories, fueling groundbreaking research in genomics, drug design, and personalized medicine. Now, with a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, UChicago’s high-performance computing resource for biomedical research is ready for an upgrade that will enable the next wave of pioneering discoveries.
 

Event
Ishanu Chattopadhyay, Conte Center for Computational Neuropsychiatric Genomics; James Evans, Knowledge Lab
May 20, 2015
Searle 240A, University of Chicago & Webcast via BlueJeans

Abstract: We will explore the nature and limits of mining and linking textual information from scientific publications, and the possibilities that it unlocks for understanding: (1)

Event
Anna Goldenberg, University of Toronto
October 17, 2014
University of Chicago, Searle 240A

Combining multiple types of measurements to create a comprehensive view of a given disease or a biological process has become an important computational challenge.

Event
Christopher Mason, Weill Cornell Medical College
April 14, 2014
University of Chicago, Searle 240A

Integrative genomics meets big data: from single-cell, clonal analysis of tumor evolution to city-wide, personalized genome profiling

Press Release

Two major gifts will build momentum behind the University of Chicago's leadership in biomedical computation by assembling experts in the field and furnishing them with the tools to use "big data" to understand disease and solve today's health-related challenges.

These two gifts will fund related projects that are central to a much larger plan at the University that includes multiple data-driven discovery programs to improve health and medical care.