Press Release

Two University of Chicago research groups will help build the pilot phase of an ambitious new National Institutes of Health initiative to make U.S. biomedical research data and tools accessible to more scientists.

In The News
HPCwire

It's been almost a year since Chameleon, the experimental cloud computing testbed co-run by the Computation Institute and Texas Advanced Computing Center, went into full production for research use. Already, 600 users and 150 projects have used the system to test new uses and technologies for cloud computing, from finding unknown exoplanets to preventing cyberattacks. Last week, HPCwire spoke to CI Senior Fellow Kate Keahey and other members of the Chameleon team, surveying its early successes and previewing the innovations still to come.

Press Release

The full potential of cloud computing to directly impact science, medicine, transportation, and other industries has yet to be realized. To help investigate and develop this promising cloud computing future, the Computation Institute (CI) at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory and the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin today announced that the new experimental testbed, called Chameleon, is in full production for researchers across the country.

Event
David Kelly & Michael Glotter, RDCEP
February 18, 2015
Searle 240 and Webcast

Working With Climate Data and Tools

Event
Nancy Cox, University of Chicago; Paul Davé & Alex Rodriguez, Globus Genomics
November 19, 2014
University of Chicago, Searle 240, 5735 S. Ellis Ave., broadcast via Adobe Connect

INSIDE THE DISCOVERY CLOUD SPEAKER SERIES 2014-15: CATALYZING COLLABORATION

Event
May 19, 2014 to May 20, 2014
Theater, Ida Noyes Hall

Information, Interaction, and Influence
Joint University of Chicago-Digital Science Workshop on Research Information Technologies and their Role in Advancing Science

Press Release

The explosion of data across disciplines has opened up vast new possibilities for scientific discovery. But many researchers do not yet have access to the advanced infrastructure needed to work with Big Data and realize its full potential. With new support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Globus can expand its mission to bring the advanced data management infrastructure used by massive science collaborations to small laboratories and individual researchers around the world. The foundation’s $500,000 grant will help Globus, part of the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, evolve from a free service to a sustainable non-profit model serving hundreds of thousands of resource providers, scientists, educators, and students.

Press Release

The latest innovations in big data and computation don’t just change the tech world, they also push forward the frontiers of science. With tools such as cloud computing, urban sensors, and machine learning, scientists are asking important questions and finding new discoveries in medicine, urban studies, biology, astronomy, and beyond. Researchers from the Computation Institute, a joint initiative of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory, will discuss these advances at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), running February 13th through 17th in Chicago. 

In The News
Nature Methods

Cloud computing is rapidly catching on for businesses and consumer applications such as Gmail and Netflix. But scientists are discovering that the cloud can make their research a lot easier as well. In a news feature for Nature Methods, reporter Vivien Marx looked at how genomic research fits into the cloud, offering new opportunities for collaboration and data management.

Press Release

Two major gifts will build momentum behind the University of Chicago's leadership in biomedical computation by assembling experts in the field and furnishing them with the tools to use "big data" to understand disease and solve today's health-related challenges.

These two gifts will fund related projects that are central to a much larger plan at the University that includes multiple data-driven discovery programs to improve health and medical care.